February222014

boromirs:

The Tempest III.I

(via hughsdancys)

8AM
February202014
meme-meme:

Total deaths per planet.

meme-meme:

Total deaths per planet.

(via edwardspoonhands)

February172014

(Source: tylerdrden, via leonardofanuk)

8AM
You’re waiting for a train. A train that’ll take you far away. You know where you hope this train will take you. But you can’t know for sure. Yet it doesn’t matter. Now, tell me why?

(Source: ashleybensons, via athosds)

February32014

He does still surprise me and he makes me hungry to work with him and see what he does and comes up with. [The Master] was something that I came up with because I wanted to spend more time with him. We’d worked together a lot, five times. But it was never enough. It was a supporting part or something like that. It never felt like we’d gotten super dirty enough together" - Paul Thomas Anderson

(Source: dicapriho, via 9090432-deactivated20140709)

7PM
aclockworkorange:

One of the last images of Philip Seymour Hoffman, a tintype taken at the Sundance Film Festival where he made his last public appearance.

aclockworkorange:

One of the last images of Philip Seymour Hoffman, a tintype taken at the Sundance Film Festival where he made his last public appearance.

(via 9090432-deactivated20140709)

7PM
“Cinematography is more than a camera, whether that camera is a Red an Alexa or a Bolex. There is a little more to it that resolution, colour depth, latitude, grain structure, lens aberration etc. etc. etc. The lenses use for ‘Citizen Kane’ were in no way as good as a Primo or a Master Prime and the grain structure in that film is, frankly, all over the place. But the cinematography? Well, you tell me.” Roger Deakins (via otfilms)

(Source: jackcardiffs, via moviesatthetheatres)

January292014

There are times when I look at people and I see nothing worth liking.

(Source: downeying, via burnuticatotheground)

January272014

(Source: kasukabe, via moviesatthetheatres)

January222014

edwardspoonhands:

fishingboatproceeds:

tedx:

Does money make you mean? In a talk at TEDxMarin, social psychologist Paul Piff shares his research into how people behave when they feel wealthy. (Hint: badly.)

To learn more, watch the whole talk here»

I have a theory about this, which is completely unsupported by data and might be totally wrong.

I think people like to believe that their choices matter. We don’t like to consider the role that luck and circumstance plays in human life, because it makes us feel powerless and ultimately like maybe we should not even bother to get out of bed in the morning. So we find ways to imagine that we can make our own destinies and that we are in control of our own lives.

To an extent, of course, we are. Our choices do matter. But so do chance and privilege.

But I think most people want a narrative of their lives that is about something other than dumb luck. So if you become powerful or wealthy, you start to think, "This happened because I worked hard," because you did work hard. You think, "This happened because I didn’t give up," because you didn’t give up.

But THEN there is this nagging feeling that haunts you, because you know that other people also work hard and that other people also don’t give up, and that they have not experienced the same success you have.

In short, deep down you know that the game of Monopoly, through chance or through systemic injustice, has been rigged in your favor. And that makes you feel like everything is random and meaningless and you are unworthy of your good fortune, and I think many people respond to that feeling defensively: They want you to know that they made a really amazing decision to buy Park Avenue, a bold and dangerous decision. And yes, they started the game with more money, but lots of people start the game with more money and DON’T make the bold and brilliant decision to buy Park Avenue.

And in the end, this desire to build a narrative of your success that gives you agency within your own life leads to a less compassionate life. It also often I think leads to echo chambers: Because any challenge to your “I earned it” worldview is a direct attack on your feeling that you are in control of your life, you have to surround yourself with people whose own life experiences do not contradict that worldview. This is the only reason I can think of that wealthy people are literally more likely to take candy from children.

The challenge—and this is a challenge for all of us—is to internalize the roles luck and systemic injustice play in our lives while still continuing to try to be good and useful creatures. 

Glad to see that John is spending his vacation ruminating on human nature and inequality. All is right with the world.

January182014
January172014
9AM
Thief - Out of the Shadows

(Source: promised-land, via hughsdancys)

January162014
Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

(Source: blurrymelancholy, via hanniballecters)

q 

← Older entries Page 1 of 201